Not understanding how can be scary

Fairy Blog Mother: blogging help

Fairy Blog Mother

None of us are infallible, not even the Fairy Blog Mother!

For the past two days I have been struggling with my blog. If you didn’t notice, then ‘phew!’, that is a good thing, but the initiated may have spotted a slight problem, which wouldn’t have affected anybody much.

Except me! This past experience brought home how scary it can be when you don’t understand what is going on and why something doesn’t work. In this case the problem sorted itself out (with a bit of help from some experts), and now I understand a bit more about blogging.

Why am I confessing this? Well, it gave me some more empathy with beginner bloggers and how daunting blogging can be to those who aren’t technical. I remember my first days when starting my blog, how confusing it was because it wasn’t ‘obvious’, even though it was to others.

This became even more prevalent when I ventured into the world of WordPress.org, and had to learn how to understand HTML, PHP, FTP and other technical goodies. And when I went onto a WordPress forum to find out what to do, I was greeted by bright young things that spouted jargon at me left, right and centre, and became totally frustrated when I didn’t immediately understand what they were going on about.

Reading self-help books about blogging revealed there was nothing that was totally jargon free, and there was an assumption that the reader had some experience in web-language and programming. This I considered to be unfair, and I also realised that most of these books were geared towards creating blogs in WordPress.org in order to make money, as that is what made the books sell.

Thus the Fairy Blog Mother was born. I wanted to create a personality that would explain blogging in everyday language, slowly, carefully and patiently, so that anybody could start a blog. I wanted to share how I had learned how to blog, in a way that was accessible to all, so others could do the same. I made all my e-courses available for free so that not only could people gain access to them when they needed them, I could refer the links to people who could benefit from this instructions, and I have done this many times since.

Recently I have strayed from this purpose, with a post that provided code for removing comment boxes from pages in WordPress.org. It was purely for SEO reasons, and I am now ashamed, because it probably didn’t make any difference and turned some people off. From now on I will concentrate on WordPress.com, and only will offer WordPress.org elements if it doesn’t detract from the subject matter.

To help me with my quest, I would value what other people think, want, need explaining or require further research into the world of beginner blogging. I will endeavour to provide succinct explanations, and maybe all this ‘fodder’ I have in this blog may go towards a ‘totally beginner blogger’s book’ that fills in the gap that is unrequited by self-help blogging manuals.

The following two tabs change content below.
Alice Elliott writes the award winning Fairy Blog Mother blog for beginner and post-beginner bloggers to “explain things really simply” about blogging and WordPress. She provides simple, easy to understand, highly visual courses and tutorials using ordinary, everyday words. Visit her new Beginner Bloggers blog to find her latest learning resources.
Sharing is caring

Please leave a comment, we would love to hear from you!


Important GDPR stuff: before you submit your comment, you will be asked to leave your name, email and web address, so we request your permission to display this data within our comments. Be reassured this information will not be collected onto lists or used for any other purpose.

>